The Best Year Ever

Ken Saunders
4 min readJan 11, 2019
Start with Why?

I’m sure we all do it, at least I know I do. Every year around this time, usually beginning in November once the holidays have really started to kick in, I get reflective. It is especially pronounced for me because my birthday is New Years Day, so it’s kind of a built-in reflexive response. I think all of us have an internal dialog that goes something like this. “What did I accomplish this year? god it really went by so quick”. “This year is going to be different.” “This year I’m going to lose that weight, for me. I’m going to really get organized, get everything in order.” For most of us, it is a cycle that seemingly repeats itself year after year and for a good reason. We are hardwired to find the path of least resistance through life, and like a record the flow of our lives, the daily habits we’ve formed will repeat over, and over the more times it’s played. In a lot of ways this is a good thing, but like a perpetual Groundhog Day, it prevents us from achieving those goals, sure you’re might make a valiant attempt at going to the gym, changing the diet, or making whatever change it was you set for yourself. Typically most people will lose steam somewhere around 2 to 3 weeks in. Life will come up and prevent you, its funny the way those things happen that will pull you back into the old familiar pattern of your life before you attempted to make it better.

Why Is That?

According to Psychologists there are any number of reasons despite our best intentions that New Years resolutions, any resolutions really, often fail. The number one reason is that we weren’t clear on **Why** we wanted whatever change it was we said we wanted. I’ve seen this truth in my own life when I decided to leave Corporate America and grow my own business. I didn’t start to achieve the kind of success I envisioned until I got very clear on a few things, my Why? was the number one question. Why am I building a business, besides the paycheck of course? Your Why needs to be strong enough, and by that I mean your Why has to be almost emotionally charged.

Further your Why for whatever change your looking to make has to contain a deep enough meaning that if the change your seeking weren’t to happen your life would be far worse than if the change did occur. In other words, you’ve got to want the change more than you want your current situation. Once you get clear on your Why…

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Ken Saunders

Born in New York, schooled in the Berkshires, Became an adult in L.A., found my Soul in Seattle. Been writing & drinking copious amounts of coffee since 2012.